Symposium: a programme preview

UNBOUND 7 AUGWith six weeks or so until the symposium, registrations are ticking along nicely and we’re pleased to release the provisional list of presenters and papers, which can be downloaded from the links below. As well as our two keynotes, there are around 30 presentations to choose from, not counting the exhibition opening, and opportunities for interaction and textile shopping onsite.

As with the keynotes, the presenters are a mix of stalwarts and newcomers, not all from New Zealand.  The topics range from literal to lateral interpretations of the theme, with work, art, and social aspects prominent. Women as shoppers and shopworkers, high-vis clothing, literally building a space for a textile business. The national dress of Colombia, dressing for driving, the races, making a good impression. Footbinding on one hand, and Doc Martens on another. Presentations on artists’ feminist practice, both the presenter’s own work or the work of the more renowned, like Frida Kahlo. And, because it’s the 21st century, the Kardashians are in the mix, as well as earlier, less well-known screen icons. Given the theme, there’s a well over a century of history; the geography includes China, Mexico, India, Iran, Australia, Colombia and of course Aotearoa, south, north and national.

The art presentations will include a discussion by Dunedin School of Art’s Victoria Bell and Natalie Smith from the University of Otago about the accompanying Unbound exhibition, and its departure point, New Zealand photographer Christine Webster’s groundbreaking Black Carnival series. The call for projects resulted in the selection of nine artworks across a range of media; Unbound, the exhibition, will open on evening of Friday 21 September to launch the symposium.

Here’s the list of presenters and papers, subject to a couple of new titles and any other unexpected change:Unbound – presenters and papers and here’s the poster for your wall and for sharing: UNBOUND poster.

Register here

 

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Symposium announcements: the keynotes

UNBOUND 7 AUG

The symposium committee is delighted to announce that this year’s symposium will feature two eminent national speakers as our keynotes.

Nina Tonga 01Nina Tonga  is Curator Pacific Art at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. From the villages of Vaini and Kolofo’ou in Tonga, and born and raised in New Zealand, Nina specialises in contemporary Pacific art and is a doctoral candidate in Art History at the University of Auckland. Recent exhibitions include Tivaevae: Out of the Glory Box (2015) and Pacific Sisters: Fashion Activists (2018) at Te Papa.  She is currently curator for the Honolulu Biennial 2019.

Dr Jane Malthus needs little introduction to CTANZ members, or indeed members of the wider dress and textile community. A founder member and past president of the association, Jane has a formidable record in education, curation, writing and general commentary on 19th and 20th century dress. Her recent work includes a chapter on colonial New Zealand dress for a forthcoming costume history, co-curating exhibitions on Dunedin fashion in Auckland and Shanghai, and speaking on aspects of dress ranging from Regency England to 1950s royal tours of New Zealand to community groups, to Radio NZ about 19th century women’s underwear. Her CTANZ talk will revisit her work on dress reform, teasing out some strands now visible thanks in part  to the digital world.

Jane Malthus speaks to Radio NZ at Otago Museum.

Jane Malthus speaks to Radio NZ at Otago Museum.

We’ll be announcing further details about the symposium and exhibition soon; you can register for the symposium online here.

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That Bloody Petition

That Bloody Woman by Luke di Somma and Gregory Cooper. Dir. Kip Chapman. Auckland Theatre Company production. Production Photos - Michael Smith

That Bloody Woman by Luke di Somma and Gregory Cooper. Dir. Kip Chapman. Auckland Theatre Company production. Production Photos – Michael Smith

It’s a sound that reaches through New Zealand history: 28 July 1893, when the bulk of the women’s suffrage petition hit the back wall of the debating chamber after being unrolled by John Hall from the broomstick on which it had been delivered. Almost all of the petition survived this treatment to become one of the three nation-building documents constituting the National Library’s He Tohu exhibition, where visitors get to see  it under carefully controlled conditions.

The 1893 suffrage petition also takes a starring role in That Bloody Woman, Gregory Cooper and Luke di Somma’s punk rock musical about that bloody woman, Kate Sheppard, who went from being a temperance activist to the face of our $10 note. The show started out smallish in an intimate venue at the 2015 arts festival in Sheppard’s home town of Christchurch, but the bigger venues and budgets of the 2016 production by the Auckland Theatre Company and Court Theatre offered the opportunity for spectacle. Auckland designer Rachael Walker became one of the team majorly inspired by the petition as an object. As Walker notes, it was “surely impossible to stage such an internationally historical NZ achievement without a visual representation of that final petition”. The challenge, then, to transform a long roll of signatures into the wow factor.

Sky City - banners in the aisle

Sky City – banners in the aisle

If you have been to the show, you know how they did it. Walker and the team worked with Archives New Zealand to use high-resolution images of pages of the petition at a large scale, turning them into banners that unfurl at the point in the show where Hall takes his place in posterity.  Six 6m long, solenoid-activated petition sheets drop on cue, while cast members pull out two longer banners into the theatre’s aisles, in the SkyCity auditorium to a full 20m.

At least 10 people were involved in working up the concept.  Walker and the ATC production team cleaned the page images so they would stand out well to the audience; even if we can’t quite read Kate Sheppard’s signature on one of the banner, it’s there. The Bannertex fabric used met the necessary specs of being light, printable, durable, with a good fall, and washable – as Walker says, the petition is white after all. White was a key colour in the overall production design, relating to Kate’s costumes, to the white camellia suffrage symbol, and the essence of ‘freedom, purity and femininity’. Walker’s banners and Lisa Holmes’s costume designs reflected each other, with Kate’s signature also being incorporated into her own very distinctive jacket.

Esther Stevens as Kate Sheppard in That Bloody Woman Auckland Theatre Company 2016, Production Photos - Michael Smith

Esther Stevens as Kate Sheppard in That Bloody Woman Auckland Theatre Company 2016, Production Photos – Michael Smith

Rachael Walker and the production team knew during the technical rehearsal just how emotional and powerful the effect of the banner drop would be. Audience previews also confirmed it, and Walker confirms it as her favourite theatrical moment of the show. In the performance I saw during the production’s 2017 national tour, you could feel the audience smile, and more than a few people wiped an eye moist with something like pride. The entire petition is 270m long, but the scale of the 70m or so in the theatre reminds us of the scale of the undertaking, and connects us to the women behind those signatures. That Bloody Woman’s onstage cast is small, but the petition comprised the intent of thousands of women making their voices heard, then and forever. In recreating John Hall’s petition presentation, with elegance and grace, Walker and the rest of the team brought history to life.

Scale 1:25 model of the set with banners Photo Rachael Walker

Scale 1:25 model of the set with banners Photo Rachael Walker

The ATC production team for That Bloody Woman:

MD  – Luke Di Somma;   Writers – Gregory Cooper and Luke Di Somma;  Director – Kip Chapman 
Set Design – Rachael Walker;   Costume Design –  Lisa Holmes

Lighting Design – Brendan Albrey; Props –  Amy Snape;  SM –  Cally Castell; Technical Manager – Jamie Blackburn; Lighting Op – Jamie Johnstone;  Sound Op – Arran Eley; Construction – 2 Construct

At ATC – Graphic Design – Wanda Tambrin; Production Manager – Robert Hunte

Thanks to Rachael Walker and Gregory Cooper for their assistance with this blog post, and to Rachael and ATC for the images.

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LoomRoom workshop September

shawl 99At last year’s CTANZ symposium in Hamilton, weaver Christine Keller presented the development of Dunedin’s LoomRoom and showed a shawl made in the LoomRoom by friend/colleague/student Pam McKinlay. Several symposium attendees asked Christine for a workshop so they could make their own. Christine has scheduled the requested workshop for the week before this year’s symposium. Here’s her invitation:

Spend a week in residency with master weaver Christine Keller in Dunedin’s LoomRoom and weave your own multicoloured merino scarf or shawl.

Monday 17 Sept – Friday 21 Sept, 9am – 4pm (Friday may finish a little earlier to doll up for the exhibition opening OR a bit later to weave those last inches) – then show off your sparkling new wrap at the symposium!

Objective: In this class we will start with some colour inspiration from pictures of objects you bring in and learn methods to translate those into warp dye design. Then each student will dye their warp (provided) accordingly with the appropriate dye method, and we will set up the looms and then weave the scarf in the remaining time.

shawl 1

Students should have basic knowledge of weaving and how to set up a loom. However, we will all work together and help each other. The number of participants will be limited to 6. If you’ve never woven but urgently feel you should be there you can ‘rent a buddy’ for an extra $100 and you’ll get one knowledgeable student to help with the set up for one day.

shawl 2

If people are fast as weaving I will fill in the time with sharing extra resources, giving talks and you can pick my brain…If we are slower at weaving we might drag out class times into the evenings as needed.

Price: $450 per person, includes all warp and weft, handouts, loom rental, LoomRoom residency, coffee and tea.

I hope to see you in the studio for a week of inspiring and fun creation.

Please contact Christine Keller at www.christinekeller.co.nz or at mindmade@hotmail.com.

shawl 3

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Images: Christine Keller

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Spring in Dunedin, or what’s on in September as well as September’s Unbound symposium

Lou Rogers, Tearing Off the Bonds, “Modern Woman” column from The Judge, c 1912-13. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Lou Rogers, Tearing Off the Bonds, “Modern Woman” column from The Judge, c 1912-13. Source: Wikimedia Commons

With less than three months to the symposium now, plans are firming up nicely, as are registrations. Announcements on keynote speakers, the programme, and the exhibition are coming soon, but before you book your travel, you might like to know what else you should allow time for. Below, some details of the exhibitions planned by our big three – Otago Museum, Dunedin Public Art Gallery, and Toitū Otago Settlers Museum, and advance notice of a serendipitously on-theme NZ exclusive Otago Arts Festival production. We’ll post more information and links as information becomes available.

There will be other exhibitions at smaller galleries and archives around town, details yet to come. Other activities around the time are Christine Keller’s weaving workshop, offered in response to requests at last year’s symposium – places are strictly limited, but we look forward to seeing some of the finished work at the symposium.

 

Dunedin Public Art Gallery has just announced Space Suit. Curated by Lucy Hammonds, this exhibition looks at contemporary sculpture and installation in the Dunedin Public Art Gallery collection to consider the changed (or unchanged) role of fabric and textiles in recent artistic practices.Ronnie van Hout Spacesuit 1996 Jim Barr and Mary Barr Collection

Ronnie van Hout
Spacesuit
1996
Jim Barr and Mary Barr Collection

 

Dunedin Public Art Gallery – Space Suit

The art gallery is a couple of blocks from Toitū Otago Settlers Museum, which in September opens Suffrage & beyond: 1893 – 2018, which looks back to the events of 1893 and at aspects of progress and change in the lives of New Zealand women over the ensuing 125 years.

Closer to the symposium, the Otago Museum is marking its own significant milestone: 150 years since its foundation. The celebrations will include Est. 1868, featuring highlights from the Museum’s significant collections, including some of its textile treasures.

Beloved Muse TileThe symposium weekend is also the opening of the Otago Arts Festival. While the full programme has yet to be announced, we can offer a heads-up on Beloved Muse, which is right up the symposium alley, being a one-woman show on the life of early 20th century Viennese fashion designer, Emilie Flöge. Presented by Maxi Blaha and written by British playwright Penny Black, the show at Dunedin’s beautiful Savoy is a New Zealand exclusive for the festival.

More announcements to come.

CTANZ Symposium 2018

 

 

 

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Children of Mallarmé: Fashion, Art & Collaboration – new exhibition

The Tauranga Art Gallery has recently opened a new exhibition entitled Children of Mallarmé: Fashion, Art & Collaboration.

The exhibition is named after Stéphane Mallarmé, a Symbolist poet who published a spirited journal on fashion cum art project entitled La Dernière Mode in 1874. Drawing on the spirit of Mallarmé, the curators highlight collaborations between New Zealand and Australian fashion designers and visual artists over the past three decades.

Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Disturbances of Motion, 2003. Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Hydrogen Bomb Explosion Zones, 2003. WORLDman, Off the Handle Blazer and By Ear Trouser, Spring Summer 2016/2017. Reuben Paterson, The Erotic Champions of the World (I and II) (details), 2009/10.

Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Disturbances of Motion, 2003. Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Hydrogen Bomb Explosion Zones, 2003. WORLDman, Off the Handle Blazer and By Ear Trouser, Spring Summer 2016/2017. Reuben Paterson, The Erotic Champions of the World (I and II) (details), 2009/10. Photo: Tauranga Art Gallery

The collaborators include Workshop with John Reynolds; Doris de Pont with John Pule, Richard Killeen and Tracey Williams; WORLD with Reuben Paterson; Jimmy D with Andrew McLeod; and the Australian duo Romance Was Born with Nell and Jess Johnson.

Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Disturbances of Motion, 2003. Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Hydrogen Bomb Explosion Zones, 2003. WORLDman, Off the Handle Blazer and By Ear Trouser, Spring Summer 2016/2017. Reuben Paterson, The Erotic Champions of the World (I and II) (details), 2009/10.

Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Disturbances of Motion, 2003. Reuben Paterson for WORLD, Hydrogen Bomb Explosion Zones, 2003. WORLDman, Off the Handle Blazer and By Ear Trouser, Spring Summer 2016/2017. Reuben Paterson, The Erotic Champions of the World (I and II) (details), 2009/10. Photo: Tauranga Art Gallery

The exhibition has been curated by Peter Shand, Head of Elam Visual Arts, Creative Arts and Industries at Auckland University,  and Karl Chitham, the director of TAG. It runs until September 16, 2018.

 

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Fashion Matters: fashion, art and society with Dr Peter McNeil – lecture series

Fashion Matters: fashion, art and society with Dr Peter McNeil

The Friends of Te Papa are offering lovers of fashion history a wonderful treat this year. They have enticed Dr Peter McNeil to deliver a series of six lectures in Wellington over the next few months under the umbrella of Fashion matters: fashion, art and society.

 

 

 

 

 

Peter is a highly regarded fashion historian and currently Professor of Design History at University of Technology, Sydney. He was a key player in the development of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s sensational exhibition Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear 1715-2015 which is on at the Museum of Applied Sciences & Arts in Sydney.

We hope members of CTANZ will be able to join us for some of Peter’s lectures.

Art + Fashion – the first lecture, Friday the 13th!

Auspiciously, Peter’s lecture series kicks off on Friday 13 July 5.30 – 7.15 pm with Art + Fashion, the theme of which has been chosen for the closing weekend of Te Papa’s exhibition Pacific Sisters: Fashion Activists. In this lecture, Peter will explore the twining of art and fashion from the middle ages to now.

 

 

 

 

 

Fashion & Textiles: Eden to Edo

On Friday 24 August 5.30 – 7.15 pm, Peter explores the many ways in which the world fashion is bound up with botanical knowledge.

A WOW Weekend – two lectures in October

During WOW you can enjoy a double dose of fashion history with High Heel Heaven on Saturday 6 October, 10:30 am12pm, followed by Pretty gentlemen on Sunday 7 October, 10:30 am12pm. In Pretty Gentlemen, Peter celebrates the hipsters of the late 18th century. These dashing young men in their tight suits, clashing colours, and high wigs, are the subject of Peter’s latest book, also titled Pretty Gentlemen.

Revolutionary fashion

On Sunday 11 November, 3.30 to 5pm, Peter explores the tumult of fashion before and after the French Revolution, including the ‘Incredible’ and ‘Marvellous’ ones, the Incroyables and Merveilleuses, who emphasised the theatricality of fashion and wore some of the most extreme fashion ever seen.

A touch of inter-war magic

The series ends with Magic fashion on Sunday 9 December, 3:30 pm5pm. In this lecture Peter focuses on the creative circles of fashion and design in inter-war Paris, including fashion, fantasy and surrealism, which of course means Elsa Schiaparelli!

A discount for the dedicated

Tickets Friends of Te Papa $20, non-members $25, students $15. If you sign up for ALL six lectures you save $30.

The ticket price includes a glass of wine and parking at Te Papa.

Book your seats through the Friends of Te Papa website.

 

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Symposium registrations are open

Lou Rogers, Tearing Off the Bonds, “Modern Woman” column from The Judge, c 1912-13. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Lou Rogers, Tearing Off the Bonds, “Modern Woman” column from The Judge, c 1912-13. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Registrations are now open for  September’s 2018 CTANZ symposium, Unbound: Liberating Women, in Dunedin, acknowledging Suffrage125 by celebrating the relationships between women, cloth and clothing. We’ll be making a few announcements between now and then, but for now, a reminder that the symposium features

  •  Nationally recognised keynote speakers
  • The usual range of passionate, informed and/or idiosyncratic papers presented by passionate, informed and/or idiosyncratic textile and dress aficionados
  • An accompanying exhibition, Unbound, opening on Friday 21 September, featuring responses to the work of Christine Webster’s Black Carnival series
  • In Otago Polytechnic’s The Hub, a venue that allows us to include a number of other activities and attractions to complement the symposium
  • An optional symposium dinner at New Zealand’s most famous Victorian castle. Which is partly on theme, with its nod to that significant Victorian-era development that was women’s suffrage, but mostly because Larnach Castle means delicious food in a stunning venue with spectacular views (and transport is included).

That will keep us all busy for the weekend, but we would be remiss in not recommending that you allow yourself some extra time because our local institutions are planning some great and relevant exhibitions around then. More to come on this too as they release their exhibition plans for the rest of the year. The symposium also coincides with the opening weekend of the Otago Arts Festival, which will include other on-theme events.

Some practicalities: between Wotif and Air BnB you should find a range of interesting accommodation options in Dunedin but to be within easy walking distance of Otago Polytechnic, look for north Dunedin locations.

Symposium 2018

 

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Threads that bind – Artefact

ARTEFACT_Threads That Bind_May-Ana Tirikatene-SullivanIf you haven’t yet watched Maori TV’s wonderful series Artefact, the good news is that it’s only half way through, it’s all online, and you really won’t want to miss the episode scheduled for 28 May, Threads that Bind.

May-Ana Tirikatene-Sullivan (above) introduces us to the politically significant wardrobe of her mother, the late Hon Whetu Tirikatene-Sullivan; artists Tame Iti and Rosanna Raymond talk about  power dressing and style, and designer Kiri Nathan about her high-fashion label.

Tame Iti, gentleman of style

Tame Iti, gentleman of style

Rosanna Raymond, Backhand Maiden, at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art

Rosanna Raymond, Backhand Maiden, at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art

Kiri Nathan working on a garment

Kiri Nathan working on a garment

Each has a considered conversation with the series presenter, Dame Anne Salmond, about how heritage and modern techniques work together to make their  statements. And there are lots of gorgeous shots of the garments and objects in question. And Veranoa Hetet talking weaving, and the Soldiers Rd Portaits studio. If you missed it, that’s what on demand is for.

Artefact is on Maori TV on Mondays, 8.30 or online on demand http://www.maoritelevision.com/tv/shows/artefact

Images supplied by Maori Television.

 

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Exhibition roundup

From Auckland to Dunedin, there are exhibitions opening, closing and continuing over the next few months. Here’s a selection (and there are more – let us know), starting with what’s finishing first.

In Wellington, this is the last week of Native Eye, a selection of photographs by Māori fashion designer and artist Suzanne Tamaki, displayed in large-scale lightboxed on Courtney Place. Curated by Reuben Friend, the lightboxes feature art-fashion garments and fashion photographs inspired by Māori interpretations of Western concepts such as feminism, or mana wāhine.

Courtney Place Park, to 31 May

Native Eye

Suzanne Tamaki, Native Eye, Courtney Place Park, image courtesy Wellington City Council

Suzanne Tamaki, Native Eye, Courtney Place Park, image courtesy Wellington City Council

In Auckland, the Pah Homestead has just opened Living Cloth, Textile Works from the Wallace Arts Trust Collection, curated by Harriet Matilda Rogers, 2018 Wallace Arts Trust Summer Intern. One of a group of summer interns, Harriet’s assembled an exhibition celebrating textiles and the ways that they surround us in our everyday lives, looking at how contemporary NZ artists have used textile materials or techniques in their work, and exploring the cross-over between art, craft, and decorative arts. Most works come from within the last 10 years, but there are also sprinkling of important pieces by major artists such as Gordon Crook and Malcolm Harrison.

Pah Homestead, 22 May – 8 July

Living Cloth

Gordon Crook, Home Leave

Gordon Crook, Home Leave

Across town at Waitakere‘s Te Uru, textiles are among the media mix for Wellingon artist Erica van Zon’s Jade Tableau, part of a yearlong project of working with the colour green. Having printed images of Te Uru’s distinctive aluminium cladding onto silk, van Zon converts the Window Space into a surreal continuation of the building; inside the gallery, van Zon offers a range of media from beading and embroidery to steel work printed silk, whose forms and arrangement adhere to the visual structure of the grid.

Te Uru Contemporary Gallery, 1 May – 3 July 2018

Jade Tableau

Erica van Zon, Jade Tableau. Image courtesy of Te Uru

Erica van Zon, Jade Tableau. Image courtesy of Te Uru

And back in Dunedin, word is getting out about Kawita Vatanajyankur’s installation, Performing Textiles, which was the work developed while she was in New Zealand in 2017 as part of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery’s Visiting Artist Programme. The works combine her body with techniques involved in manufacturing textiles, in a thoughtful, provocative and moving suite of images.

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, 5 May – 26 August

Performing Textiles

Kawita  Vatanajyankur, from Performing Textiles. Image courtesy of Dunedin Public Art Gallery

Kawita Vatanajyankur, from Performing Textiles. Image courtesy of Dunedin Public Art Gallery

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If you’re nowhere any of these exhibitions, you may also like to check out the NZ Fashion Museum’s new online exhibition Remember the 80s: On the Edge, Over the Top. Those of us who were there might think the over the top thing’s a bit OTT itself  – but check it out for yourselves; you may have some classic 80s garments to add to the museum’s virtual collection as well.

Remember the 80s

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