Madelyn Shaw’s Dunedin talks

Visiting Smithsonian textiles curator Madelyn Shaw is having a busy time of her visit to New Zealand, and the Dunedin leg is no exception, with talks on Sunday at Otago Museum (Hutton Theatre, 2pm) and Monday at Otago Polytechnic.

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(You can read more about the wonderful coat on the poster in this Otago Museum blogpost by Jamie Metzger.)

Monday’s talk on The Geometries of Cloth and Clothing explores  how curves of the human body and the flatness of cloth marry together , with examples from various cultures, times and places.

Otago Polytechnic, Room G106 11 am Monday 1 May. All welcome.

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Free fashion lecture this Saturday 22 April – 3pm – Auckland Museum

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Amy Johnson, c.1930 (Public Domain image)

CTANZ, in association with the Auckland Museum Institute & with thanks to the Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, is delighted to present

High Flown Fashion: Women Pilots and the Selling of Aviation 1909-1939

Guest speaker

Madelyn Shaw, Curator of Textiles at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

In 1928, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean by air, when she rode as a passenger in a plane captained and navigated by two men.  This flight, coming a year after Charles Lindbergh’s nonstop solo flight between New York and Paris in May 1927, heightened the marketing frenzy among manufacturers and designers eager to share in the lustre of aviation’s heroes.  Earhart (who later made the trans-Atlantic flight on her own) joined Lindbergh as the most influential spokespersons for American aviation.

But the years between 1909 and 1939, sometimes considered aviation’s “Golden Age,” produced many female pilots—household names in their day—who worked hard for the cause of aviation.  Women such as Harriet Quimby, Amy Johnson, Louise Thaden, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Elinor Smith, Ruth Nichols, Fay Gillis, and Jacqueline Cochran played important roles in socializing aviation, through their flying skills and their public images.  This talk explores how “clothes made the [wo]man,” helping female pilots promote aviation as a safe, commonplace mode of transportation.

This lecture is one of a series of 3, proudly brought to you by CTANZ (Costume & Textile Association of New Zealand). The other lectures will be presented in Wellington (Te Papa) and Dunedin. (Advertised soon!)

 

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CTANZ Symposium 2017 is only a month away!

THERE’S NO TIME LIKE NOW TO REGISTER

for

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HIGHLIGHTS!

Three Keynote Speakers!

Doris de Pont needs no introduction to CTANZ members: the founder of the New Zealand Fashion Museum will talk about how her ongoing exploration of the ways clothing can signify or express identity and belonging connects both her fashion careers.

Sarah Lancaster is another fashion entrepreneur: her Sew Love workshops tour the country to share her beliefs that sewing isn’t just about bringing two pieces of fabric together – it’s also about bringing people together to show how life can be more satisfying when you consume less.

Auckland consultant, artist and former gallerist Pamela Elliott will offer a perspective on the relationships formed by her multi-stranded career in textiles.

Outside the keynotes, we have a fabulous array of topics for your enjoyment, delivered by a range of CTANZ stalwarts and newcomers.

It won’t be long before the programme is out but in the meantime here’s a taste of what’s to come:

The focus of Dr. Tracey Wedge’s (Matakohe Kauri Museum) talk are garment fragments with a connection to Mary Queen of Scots from two NZ museum collections while Ann Somerville will discuss a collection of 2000 garments (the Norma Evans Collection) that she and fellow Rotorua Museum colleague Rosemary Deane have been researching.

Young Samoan/European textile designer Sonya Withers relates her personal journey discovering the significance of Siapo (tapa cloth) in relation to her own practice while Priscilla Gear (Southland Museum) narrates the story of a striking 1858 blue and white striped silk wedding dress in the museum’s collection.

WHERE: Waikato Museum, Hamilton

WHEN: Friday 19th May – Saturday 20 May, 2017
(Official opening/exhibition opening 5pm, 18th May)

COST: For 2-day Symposium, lunch both days, morning & afternoon teas and an invitation to attend the official opening of the Symposium and the associated exhibition ‘Fibre: Connecting People‘ on Thursday 18th May, 5.30 at the Waikato Museum:

$ 120 (for CTANZ members and Friends of the Waikato Museum)
$ 180  (non members)
$ 140 (Students)
$ 60 (Optional) Symposium Dinner

Why not consider joining CTANZ too (or renew if you haven’t already) and receive your first major benefit – discounted registration!
To join, simply contact our Membership Secretary Kim: membership@costumeandtextile.co.nz

HOW TO REGISTER

Simply following this link (or cut and paste it into your browser)- REGISTRATION FORM SYMPOSIUM 2017

To keep up to date with Symposium News go to www.costumeandtextile.co.nz or email sharon@parnassus.co.nz

 

 

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Floor talk with Natalie Smith

WHEN DREAMS TURN TO GOLD: The Benson & Hedges and Smokefree Fashion Design Awards 1964-1998

10.30am Wednesday 19 April, Dunedin Public Art Gallery FREE

Join the Friends of the Gallery for an informal talk and walk through the exhibition When Dreams Turn to Gold with scholar and independent curator Dr Natalie Smith.

Offering glamour, spectacle, opportunity and reward, the Benson & Hedges Fashion Design Awards elevated the profile of New Zealand fashion from the 1960s to the 1990s.  The awards offered a platform for design excellence, high style, cultural change and political comment. Featuring garments, photography and film footage, When Dreams Turn to Gold explores the changing face of recent New Zealand fashion through the lens of this prominent award.

Co-curated by Lucy Hammonds and Dr Natalie Smith, with curatorial support from Andrea Bell.

 

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Lecture: Dreams and Responsibilities: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Ireland

Te Papa, Friday 28 April 2017, 4:30pm – 6pm

Friends of Te Papa $15, non-members $25 (includes a glass of wine and free parking)

Dr Joseph McBrinn, Reader in design history at the Belfast School of Art, Ulster University, is coming to New Zealand to present a paper at the Myriad Faces of War symposium on a work-box embroidered by a disabled soldier that was presented to the Dominion Museum, now Te Papa, by Queen Mary in 1946.

Black work embroidered workbox by the Soldiers Embroidery Industry, 1920-30, England. Gift of Her Majesty Queen Mary, 1946. Te Papa

Following the symposium, he will present an illustrated lecture on Dreams and Responsibilities: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Ireland at Te Papa.

Many traditional crafts flourished throughout Ireland well into the nineteenth century. However, the national calamity of the mid-century Famine and the mass emigration it stimulated, as well as uneven industrial development and increasing religious and political sectarianism created a profound instability and long-lasting poverty that shocked even William Morris when he came to Ireland in 1877 and again in 1886. The Irish Arts and Crafts movement initially emerged under Morris’s influence but like other small nations on Europe’s peripheries (such as Poland, Hungary or Finland) Ireland’s struggle for self-determination, and ultimately modernization, was accompanied by a unique reinvestment in its folk and vernacular heritage.

S. Rosamond Praeger working on the decoration of the façade of the Thomas Andrews/Titanic Memorial Hall.

S. Rosamond Praeger working on the decoration of the façade of the Thomas Andrews/Titanic Memorial Hall.

This illustrated lecture will look at some of the key centres of Arts and Crafts activity in Ireland, such as the cities of Dublin, Cork and Belfast. Women who played a crucially important role in this movement includes Mabel Annesley, who left Ireland for New Zealand at the outbreak of the second World War.

Dr. Joseph McBrinn is Reader in design history at Belfast School of Art of Ulster University. He previously taught at the National College of Art and Design in Dublin. Previous to this he studied and worked in Scotland and France.

He has written and lectured widely on Irish art, craft and design. He has written biographical studies of the Northern Irish artists Sophia Rosamond Praeger (1867-1954) and John Luke (1906-1975), and curated retrospective exhibitions of their work: in 2007 (for The Naughton Gallery, Queen’s University Belfast); and in 2012 (for the Ulster Museum/National Museums Northern Ireland) respectively.

He serves on the editorial board and editorial advisory boards of The Journal of Modern Craft, Textile: Cloth and Culture and The Irish Arts Review. His current research focuses on the intersection of masculinity and design with a particular interest in the First World War and interwar Britain.

Seaghan Mac Cathmhaoil, Illustration of Thinkin’ Long folksong, from Songs from “The Four Winds of Eirinn (1906), Private Collection.

Seaghan Mac Cathmhaoil, Illustration of Thinkin’ Long folksong, from Songs from “The Four Winds of Eirinn (1906), Private Collection.

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Symposium 2017 update

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The 2017 Symposium countdown continues with registrations bubbling along and some of the programme highlights  available. This year’s symposium begins with an exhibition opening on Thursday 18 May; the programme for the next two days includes three keynote speakers, Doris de Pont, Sarah Lancaster, and Pamela Elliott.

Doris de Pont needs no introduction to CTANZ members: the founder of the New Zealand Fashion Museum will talk about how her ongoing exploration of the ways clothing can signify or express identity and belonging connects both her fashion careers.

Sarah Lancaster is another fashion entrepreneur: her Sew Love workshops tour the country to share her beliefs that sewing isn’t just about bringing two pieces of fabric together – it’s also about bringing people together to show how life can be more satisfying when you consume less.

The third keynote speaker, Auckland consultant, artist and former gallerist Pamela Elliott will offer a perspective on the relationships formed by her multi-stranded career in textiles.

Outside the keynotes, a range of CTANZ stalwarts and newcomers will present on topics including Tudor fragments, wool marketing, weaving, Samoan textiles, possum pelts…as usual, subjects and styles will be distinctive and diverse, academic and personal.

The symposium will begin with Thursday night’s opening of the Fibre Connecting People: a multicultural fibre art exhibition  at the Waikato Museum, featuring textile items holding special significance to migrants, either linking them to their past or connecting them to their new experience. Each article will be accompanied by narrative on textile and experience, using these to explore  common threads of the migrant life and highlight connections and cohesion.

And while the exhibition and the programme will keep you busy, for those who take the opportunity to explore Hamilton, the organisers have put together a CTANZ Waikato Shopping Guide 2017 to set you in the right direction.

All details are on the registration form – register now!

 

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Lecture tour: Madelyn Shaw, Curator of Textiles, Smithsonian

Madelyn Shaw is the Curator of Textiles at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC. She specialises in the exploration of American culture and history through textiles and dress.

Madelyn is visiting New Zealand in April / May for a conference. Much to our delight, the CTANZ has been able to encourage her to extend her stay in order to present a series of lectures in Auckland, Wellington and Dunedin focusing on different aspects of textile histories, from women pilots to ‘exoticism’ in fashion.

High Flown Fashion: Women Pilots and the Selling of Aviation, 1909-39

Auckland War Memorial Museum, Saturday 22 April 3pm FREE

In 1928, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to cross the Atlantic Ocean by air, when she rode as a passenger in a plane captained and navigated by two men.  This flight, coming a year after Charles Lindbergh’s nonstop solo flight between New York and Paris in May 1927, heightened the marketing frenzy among manufacturers and designers eager to share in the lustre of aviation’s heroes.  Earhart (who later made the trans-Atlantic flight on her own) joined Lindbergh as the most influential spokespersons for American aviation.

Cover: Needlecraft Magazine, May 1930

Cover: Needlecraft Magazine, May 1930

But the years between 1909 and 1939, sometimes considered aviation’s “Golden Age,” produced many female pilots—household names in their day—who worked hard for the cause of aviation.  Women such as Harriet Quimby, Amy Johnson, Louise Thaden, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Elinor Smith, Ruth Nichols, Fay Gillis, and Jacqueline Cochran played important roles in socializing aviation, through their flying skills and their public images.  This talk explores how “clothes made the [wo]man,” helping female pilots promote aviation as a safe, commonplace mode of transportation.

Exoticism in Fashion

Te Papa, Wellington, Saturday 29 April 2017, 11am – 12pm

Presented by the Friends of Te Papa. Members $10, non-members $15 (includes free parking & 20% Espresso Cafe voucher) BOOK HERE.

Otago Museum (Hutton Theatre), Dunedin, Sunday 30 April, 2pm FREE

SI Morocco plan

SI Morocco plan: HR Mallinson & Co. exhibition plan sketch for 1931 donation to Smithsonian of “Morocco” series dress silks. (NMAH/Textiles Collection)

”Exoticism’ as it applies to fashion might be defined as viewing ‘the other’ in a romantic light, resulting in mining other cultures for styles, motifs, techniques, silhouettes, colors, patterns – all the elements of design – in order to create a marketable design novelty.  This illustrated talk explores the taste for the romance of exoticism and how it continues to influence fashion today, exploring how the quest for novelty and lure of exoticism can create a cultural connection that transcends romance. [A version of Exoticism in Fashion was published in an anthology, Global Textile Encounters, by the Danish Centre for Textile Research, University of Copenhagen.]

28BBk.colorad: 1928 “Blue Book of Silks” back cover. H.R. Mallinson & Co. American Indian series of printed dress silks. (Private collection)

28BBk.colorad: 1928 “Blue Book of Silks” back cover. H.R. Mallinson & Co. American Indian series of printed dress silks. (Private collection)

Madelyn Shaw – Bio

Madelyn Shaw is the Curator of Textiles at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. Recent projects include an award-winning Civil War sesquicentennial book and traveling exhibition, Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War, the exhibition Color Revolution: Science Meets Style in the 1960s; and the book Clothing through American History: The British Colonial Era for ABC-Clio Press.

She contributed the case study “H. R. Mallinson & Company” to American Silk: Entrepreneurs & Artifacts, 1830-1930, winner of the Millia Davenport Award. Ms. Shaw has previously held curatorial and administrative positions at the Museum at FIT, the Textile Museum, the RISD Museum, the New Bedford Whaling Museum, and the Heritage Museums and Gardens.

CTANZ would like to thank co-hosts, the Auckland War Memorial Museum, Otago Museum and Otago Polytechnic, for making this tour possible.

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Exhibition: Current

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Current, Otago Museum, 1877 Gallery, 18 March – 2 July 2017

To coincide with this year’s  iD Fashion Week, the Otago Museum invited a group of emerging artists and designers to create new work based on the museum’s extensive textile collections. The result is fabulous.

It’s not a big exhibition, just nine objects and nine works in one of the exhibition spaces in the original part of the museum. Objects are displayed so you can get a good look at them, especially the original objects, which get you close enough to see the delicate darns in the stockings that inspired artist Devon Smith’s drawings or the scales of the salmon skin suit from China that Melanie Child echoes in her denim dress, jacket and scarf.

Over on a table, you can get closer still to the technicalities of some of the new work, with samples of the prints and fabrics and ceramic used by the artists. Four of the new artworks are at least garment-shaped, but transformations are various, from one kaftan to another, from dress or bag to painting, from tiny hat to four-piece suit plus accessories, from Swanndri bush shirt to ceramics.

The electronically supplied labels are comprehensive, with a curator’s note as well as details of both objects, an artist bio and further close-up images. This information is also available at the exhibition website (below), but if you’re in Dunedin between now and 2 July, it’s an absolute delight. There will be guided tours at 2pm throughout iD Fashion Week.

Current at Otago Museum

(You can also click on the gif above for a quick runthrough of Current)

And some more indepth coverage from the ODT and Otago’s student magazine, Critic

https://www.odt.co.nz/lifestyle/magazine/drawing-threads-together

http://www.critic.co.nz/features/article/6535/current

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Meanwhile in Auckland….

Walk the walk1March is definitively New Zealand’s fashion month, with iD down in Dunedin, and Auckland’s Four Days of Fashion in the City, including films, seasonal previews and other special activities. The four days specifically are 29 March – 1 April, but things kick off on 22 March with a special New Zealand Fashion Museum exhibition with new interactive twists: the walking tour and the museum’s first ever live fashion show.

 Walk the Walk: A history of fashion in the city will reveal the traces that remain of our inner city fashion history through an exhibition of beautiful garments, two live fashion parades and a guided walking tour of the city.

Smith & Caughey’s will host the Walk the Walk exhibition in the historic Lippincott Room on the 6th floor. The exhibition will provide a rare opportunity to visit this lovely venue and an auspicious background for the Fashion Museum to display garments from over 20 local designers, manufacturers and retailers from the past and today. A curator’s tour will take place on 22 and 24 March at 12pm.

More in-depth insight to our city’s rich history will be revealed through a series of 45 minute guided walking tours of related fashion sites around the city. Register for the walking tours by emailing us. Include your name and the session you’d like to attend.

The Walk the Walk: a history of fashion in the city programme will culminate in two dynamic live catwalk events on Elliott Street on Saturday 1 April. Wear your New Zealand fashion to go into the draw for a goodie bag supplied by Smith & Caughey’s..

Participation in all parts of the Walk the Walk: a history of fashion in the city programme is free to the public.

Exhibition 22 – 31 March, 11am to 5pm
Curator’s tour 22 and 24 March, 12pm; 25 March, 10.30am

Walking tours: Thursday 23 March, 5pm; Saturday 25 March, 12.30pm (fully booked); Saturday 25 March, 2pm; Tuesday 28 March, 12:30pm; Thursday 30 March, 12.30pm; Thursday 30 March, 5pm

For more details:

http://nzfashionmuseum.org.nz/

The Costume & Textile Association of New Zealand is delighted to be a Foundation Fan supporter of the New Zealand Fashion Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Auckland, Exhibitions, Fashion, History, Lectures & Talks, Museums, New Zealand, Shopping, Shows | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Exhibition: Emma Kitts and the event of a thread

The Dowse Art Museum, 25 March – 02 July 2017

Floortalk Sat 25 March 11:00 am

Join artist Emma Fitts and curator Melanie Oliver in conversation at the Dowse about textiles, feminist history and the exhibition From Pressure to Vibration—The Event of a Thread.

From Pressure to Vibration—The Event of a Thread will engage the history of textiles in Aotearoa New Zealand through artist Emma Fitts working in response to and alongside a selection of works from The Dowse Art Museum collection.

Emma Fitts with a work by Joan Calvert at The Dowse. Photo by Melanie Oliver.

Emma Fitts with a work by Joan Calvert at The Dowse. Photo by Melanie Oliver.

Looking at the relationship of textiles to architecture, modernism, Māori weaving, garment making and the local textile industry, Fitts will draw out connections and the broader historical context for these collection works with a focus on the social dimension that is rarely captured in archives.

A rising interest in textiles internationally has brought fresh scholarship on fibre art and the Bauhaus Women Weavers, in particular weaver and writer Anni Albers, who was an important inspiration for weavers in New Zealand in the 1970s and 80s. Making textiles was a popular art form at this time, strongly related to the contemporary architecture, ceramics and education practices that flourished. After losing favour for a few decades, we are now seeing a resurgence of weaving within the arts due to its material tactility and the distinctive ability for textiles to tell stories. Fitts creates fabric works that are sculptural rather than weaving, but her work reflects on the figures, thoughts and feelings of various textile narratives and moments in time.

The exhibition will include work by Judy Patience, Margery Blackman, Sheila  Reimann, Kathleen Low, Zena Abbott, Ruth Castle, Joan Calvert, Georgia Suiter, Jenny Hunt, Erenora Puketapu-Hetet, Philipa Devonshire and Whiona Epiha.

Margery Blackman a her loom. Dowse Art Museum.

 

Posted in Artists, Craft, CTANZ people, Emma Fitts, Lectures & Talks, Local events, Maori, Museums, Textiles, Wellington | Leave a comment